About the Author

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Southport, Manitoba, Canada
Steve Pomroy is a professional flight instructor and aviation writer. He has been teaching since 1995 and holds an Airline Transport Pilot License, Class 1 Instructor and Aerobatic Instructor Ratings, military QFI, and an undergraduate degree in Mechanical Engineering. He's written and published three flight training books through his company, SkyWriters Publishing, and has several other books under development. Steve currently teaches RCAF pilot candidates on their Primary Flight Training course.

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Aerobatic Prep

So the students here are all gone home for Xmas, leaving us to conduct proficiency flying and catch up on paperwork. Since I won't actually have any students of my own until after New Years, my paperwork load is pretty slim. That means I get to focus on getting ready for my Aerobatic Instructor flight test—if the weather changes, that is.

The problem, however, is that the weather isn't cooperating. It hasn't been for some time now. I had a 4 week stretch without flying during November/December thanks to the weather. Whenever it did clear up, students had priority. So since I don't have my own students, I got to sit on the ground. I got a couple of flights in a few days ago, and that's about it.

It's amazing how quickly g-tolerance deteriorates when you get out of practice. Ditto for maneuvering tolerance with regard to airsickness. It comes back fast, but the first hard aerobatic flight (or three) after an extended break can be pretty rough.

Unfortunately, the Grob isn't certified for snaprolls, instead they're a prohibited maneuver. It's too bad, since snaprolls are one of my favourite aerobatic maneuvers. The good news is that we can still do hammerheads (my second favorite!), and the other 8 maneuvers required on the ride (Spin, Barrel Roll, Slow Roll, Immelman, Split-S, 1/2 Cuban-8, 1/2 Reverse Cuban-8), not to mention a few others that can be flown just for fun.

Now if only the weather would clear up so I could fine-tune the maneuvers and the teaching...

Happy Flying!

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